About your Search

20121101
20121130
STATION
MSNBCW 14
CNNW 9
KQED (PBS) 5
CSPAN2 2
KQEH (PBS) 2
KRCB (PBS) 2
FBC 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
KTVU (FOX) 1
LANGUAGE
English 51
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 51 (some duplicates have been removed)
hillary clinton involved in a major deal with israel and hamas. a cease-fire that's to end bloodshed on both sides of the border. but there's violence including a bus bombing injuring nearly two dozen people in the heart of tel aviv. we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer reporting from jerusalem. you're in "the situation room." >>> we're now two hours into a cease-fire between israel and hamas and so far things have been relatively quiet. the israeli military reports at least two rockets being fired into israel after the cease-fire deadline. this is the scene right now in gaza city. it's remarkable. for the first time in days people are out in the streets. they are celebrating. traffic is bumper-to-bumper. everyone, everyone appears to be in celebration. people waving flags and firing guns in the air. while our crews saw outgoing rockets and heard explosions in the hours leading up to the cease-fire deadline, they've seen little or no military activity since then only the celebrating. [ gunfire ] secretary of state hillar
assembly despite strong opposition by the u.s. and israel. here's israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu earlier today. >> the palestinians must recognize the jewish state. and they must be prepared to end the conflict with israel once and for all. none of these vital interests, these vital interests of peace, none of them appear in the resolution that will be put forward before the general assembly today. and that is why israel cannot accept it. >> joining me now to talk more about this, former state department mideast officer joel ruben. also palestinian italian journalist and msnbc contributor willa jabroe. both israel and the u.s. say the resolution violates agreements to solve issues through negotiations which broke down two years ago. on the heels of the recent violent clashes between gaza and israel is now the right time for this vote? >> well, it's a fate acomply that the vote is going to take place. it's been in the works for some time before -- really the bigger issue is how will the parties react after it? there's been a calm reaction to far. there should be one. they need to
's commitment to israel's security and right to defend itself. the cease-fire announced 90 minutes ago with secretary of state hillary clinton and egypt's foreign minister standing side by side. secretary clinton calling the agreement a step in the right direction. >> united states welcomes the agreement today for a cease-fire in gaza. the rocket attacks must end. a broader, calmer return. the people of the region deserve the chance to live free from fear and violence and today's agreement is a step in the right direction that we should build on. >> today's announcement follows secretary clinton's diplomatic barnstorm through the middle east and made stops in egypt, west bank and egypt. and it follows more than a week of cross border rocket fire exchanges between israel and hamas in gaza. now, that has left 100 people dead. joining me now from gaza is nbc news foreign correspondent amman mulhadeen. i saw you turn around and notice the night skylight up behind you. that was a minute within the cease-fire taking effect. do we know that's rocket fire coming in behind you? >> reporter: it
waving because of an impending decision at the united nations. i'll ask israel's ambassador to the united states why he thinks -- why his country thinks the u.n.'s possibly interaction is a bad idea. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> we begin with today's hard words in the negotiations to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff. that steep across the board spending cut and tax increase scheduled to hit in just 33 days. in a scathing assessment today, the speaker of the house john boehner says there's been no substantive progress on a deal. need to realize there can be no deal without tax rates going up for top earners. let's go live to our chief white house correspondent jessica yellin. she's got more on the latest developments. tough talk from both sides, jessica. >> reporter: tough talk and some bright lines, wolf. on the same day that treasury secretary tim geithner went to capitol hill to meet with both democrats and republicans to talk about these negotiations, there is tense body language and tough words on both sides of pennsylvania avenue. they're starting to sound du
, it will be a familiar scene on the ground here in israel for people in tel aviv and all across the country. this was a tactic used a lot by palestinian militants about a decade ago. in recent years they haven't seen it. the last bus blast was back in 2004. and just soon after it, a spokesman for hamas came out with a statement calling it a heroic attack. chris? >> stephanies go income tel aviv for us. thank you. i want to play for you something hillary clinton had to say yesterday. >> america's commitment to israel's security is rock solid and unwavering. that is why we believe it is essential to de-escalate the situation in gaza. the goal must be a durable outcome that promotes regional stability and advances the security and legitimate aspirations of israelis and palestinians alike. >> obviously, there's a lot at stake here for the people who live in the region, for the entire international community. but politically, i'm wondering what's at stake for hillary clinton and for this white house that seems to be approaching the middle east process differently than it did in the first term. >
. just hours now into a ceasefire that ends the worst fighting between israel and hamas in years, one gaza city resident saying the morning coffee even tastes different, feeling as if there's a brand new start. good morning and happy thanks giving, i'm gregg jarrett in for bill hemmer. >> and i'm iowansly err hart. secretary clinton is telling us the international community will do its to make things better for both sides. >> the united states will work with partners across the region to consolidate this progress, improve conditions for the people of gaza, provide security for the people of israel. gregg: leland vittert is live in southern israel with the latest. leland? >> reporter: good morning, gregg. there's sort of a cold rain that has descended here on southern israel, but all is quiet on the southern front. the only sounds we are hearing is the tanks and the armored personnel carriers that the israeli army brought out to possibly launch a ground invasion of gaza now heading north, back to their bases. as life, at least a little bit, begins to return to normal. for the past eigh
. the united kingdom is condemning the, quote, shocking violence. the eight-day conflict between israel and hamas has claimed the lives of more than 130 palestinians and five israelis. despite hopes of a ceasefire, tuesday ended as the conflict's deadliest day. secretary clinton who rushed to the region to try to prevent an escalation of the conflict is in cairo to meet with egyptian president mohamed morsi who is key to brokering any deal. it's her final stop on an emergency round of shuttle diplomacy that also include meetings in israel and the west bank. for the latest nbc's stephanie gosk joins us and ayman mohyeldin. a report of a tel aviv bus explosion. is there any indication that the israelis now are looking at possibly having a short-term truce or want to hold out long er for a longer deal? >> reporter: well, we don't have a truce. there's a lot of talk yesterday that there would be one, and then this morning, today around lunch time this bus attack. and what we know about it so far is that they're saying it's a terrorist attack, it's not a suicide attack. we were down there ea
in the middle east, where the fragile truce between israel and gaza hamas rulers appears to be holding 19 hours after it began. the truce was brokered by egypt and ended eight days of fighting. the big question is, will it last. we have reporters throughout the region for you. martin fletcher is in tel aviv, and jim is in cairo. but we begin in gaza. this truce was marked by a huge celebration there in gaza today. tell us about it. >> that's true. in fact, tens of thousands of palestinians showed up in gaza city. and actually in cities all across the gaza strip to hear from various leaders of all of the palestinian factions. the biggest one was by far and large in gaza city. some leaders we haven't heard in the past eight days, many in hiding, came out today to address the thousands of people who gathered. they're portraying this and describing this as a victory. they say for the first time hamas has not only defeated israel, but has also shown the world what they're about against a back drop of changes taking place all across the arab world. they also sent a message to the united states saying
turmoil. >> former defense -- well, defense minister and former prime minister in israel has announced he's not seeking a position in the next cabinet after the election. does this signal anything about the situation vis-a-vis iran since he was one of the most hawkish of the cabinet members on iran? >> no doubt it reflects i'm sure a set of personal considerations for him, but the fact is he has been the architect of the options vis-a-vis iran, he has been the one who basically has outlined why it has to be dealt with, even though he wants to put it in the context of close u.s./israeli relations. ultimately israel has to find a way to deal with it either on its own or with us. >> israel has talked about a ship that's loaded with rockets potentially heading to gaza. so is there another crisis brewing? where do we stand with the cease-fire, where both sides seem to be testing each other the last few days? >> i believe the cease-fire in fact is going to hold. if you look at all three parties who were involved in it aside from the united states, who i think did play a pivotal role at the end.
resistance to israel, controls gaza. after long opposing abbas's u.n. efforts, the militant hamas recently endorsed the move. >> ( translated ): the hamas movement is with all the diplomacy acts that adds to the palestinian victories. we welcome the step for statehood at the united nations but we want it to be through a national program based on the resistance and keeps the palestinian rights. >> warner: general assembly recognition would put palestine on a par with the vatican at the u.n., but would not grant full representation. last year, abbas failed to win full u.n. membership for a state of palestine. the u.s. is opposed to even limited recognition, saying it will endanger prospects for a negotiated settlement with israel. state department spokeswoman victoria nuland issued that warning again today. >> we are concerned that this vote is going to make the work of getting... the work of getting the parties back to the table more difficult. >> warner: but the palestinians' u.n. representative riyad mansour voiced the opposite view yesterday. >> it should be respected by everyone and we
pretty well in terms of -- from the western perspective in working with israel. he has a lot to prove to the outside world and his own people. >> reporter: now, the obama administration is calling for calm in egypt pushing the leadership there to work together to resolve their differences peacefully and through "democratic dialogue." joe. >> everybody i think is a little stunned about the timing of all of this, dan. is the white house saying anything about whether there's some type of linkage between the timing of the gaza agreement and this move by mohamed morsi? >> reporter: they're not at all. in fact, the white house has been really pushing a lot of the comment on this through the state department which of course as i mentioned a short time ago did release that statement. i think it's really too early to tell. they are watching carefully what the developments are there and will have more comment i suspect as they get more information. >> thanks so much for that, dan lothian at the white house. we're just over two days into the israeli/hamas cease-fire along the gaza border and alr
to stop the rocket fire into israel which as far as the united states is concerned and ben rhodes made this clear, that's the number one priority before nip other part of this negotiation is done. when you think of the time line, the president up late after all of the summit. he's here for a couple of summits. gaza has overshadowed all of that. he was up late. he was up with morsi and netanyahu. morsi is the conduit into hamas. the united states doesn't have any direct conversations with hamas. the conduit is morsi. gets off the phone with netanyahu. decides to call morsi back. after that, the president and the secretary huddle. time for shuttle diplomacy. so the decision to send her there and it comes with some risk. the united states putting that much skin in the game getting that involved if suddenly nothing is prevented and in 72 hours a ground invasion begins, a little diplomatic egg on the face of the united states and secretary clinton. there's potential reward down the road. this could be a big feather in her cap at the end of her career. but toss that aside right now, the big
in the u.n. a country. the legal ramifications for israel are not significant. and a month ago, a woman dies after doctors refused to perform her abortion. the woman's husband makes a major announcement today. let's go "outfront." we have breaking news. new details on the fiscal cliff deal that timothy geithner put on the table today during his meeting with congressional leaders on the hill. these details just coming in. jessica yellin has that and what have you learned about what geithner took you know, listed out with the numbers and put on the table? >> hey, erin, here are some of the details i'm getting from senior officials on both sides. the headline is that he put out a number of $1.6 trillion in new taxes. that was at according to republican officials, a surprise. they expected a much smaller number and that has some republicans crying foul. he proposes extending unemployment insurance. continuing the dock fix. that's approving additional spending on medicare to pay doctors. the amt patch protecting middle income americans. $50 billion in stimulus next year and in return, the ad
gears now overseas, the hamas terrorist group is accusing israel of breaking the ceasefire rules agreed to only a couple of days ago, two days after a truce was reached along the israel/gaza border. the shooting death of a palestinian man today could threaten the already-fragile agreement. conor powell is live in jerusalem with the very latest. >> reporter: well, rick, given that the level of trust between israel and hamas is so low, expectations for this ceasefire were even lower. but it appears to have passed its first major hurdle. earlier today several hundred palestinians went to the border between gaza and israel, some reportedly there to check on land across the border in israel, others were, no doubt, hamas sympathizers testing the ceasefire. but as israeli trooped told them to back off from the border area, they refused, and israeli troops opens fire killing one palestinian. both israel and hamas accused the other ofhe ceasefire agreement, but neither side took steps to escalate the violence. hamas even went so far as to say this was a clear violation of the ceasefire agreement
anniversary of the u.n. vote that created the state of israel, the u.n. officially recognized the state of palestine by a vote of 138 to 9 with 41 countries abstaining and the u.s. voting in opposition. palestine status at the u.n. was upgraded to that of nonmember observer state. while they still be only be able to own proceedings, this allows palestine to apply for membership in other international organizations. something both israel and the united states had hoped to avoid. meanwhile in egypt for the seventh day in a row protestors marched in tahrir square to have the constitutional assembly begin voting on a new constitution. yet's egypt supreme court announced that on sunday, it would decide whether or not to dissolve the constitutional assembly so voting was accelerated to perhaps render moot sunday's decision. many of whom are boycotting what they perceive to be a process hijacked by the muslim brotherhood. joining.me is james jeffrey former u.s. america west arena bass der to iraq. he served as the deputy to the
and missiles is idea behind israel so-called iron dome. said to be effective in conflict with hamas. what. we look at the questions from the pentagon. >> 1,500 rockets were fired at israel from the gaza strip in eight day of fighting. the iron dome missile system said to intercepted most of them. modern warfare game changer in the middle east. >> iron dome, performed, fair to say remarkably well. in the recent escalation. >> only 55 out of the 1,500 ended up falling. >> the u.s. taxpayers invested $275 million to help israel build and seal the iron dome which can stop incoming rockets within a 2.5-mile to 44-mile range. israel outgoing defense minister gave panetta a model as a token of gratitude. >> small iron dome. >> but the u.s. army want mrs. than a model. it wants its own antimissile system. and congress would like a favorable discount given what the u.s. has already invested in the system. >> but instead of buying from israelis who already have technology, the army may decide to start from scratch. with a u.s. con tacker. system called ai-3 to take hundreds of millions of dollars taxpa
to that cease-fire over the border that president morsi actually helped broker between israel and hamas. palestinian leaders say israel has already violated the truce. its soldiers open fire today on a group of palestinians in a buffer zone near the gaza-israeli border. sarah seidner joining us from jerusalem. sarah, no one disputes that israelis soldiers opened fire, but israel and hamas have very different views about the eths that led up to that shooting. what is each side saying? >> well, the department of health there, the ministry in gaza, is saying that these were farmers, they were out, and ended up being fired upon, but the israeli military says that these were several groups of men coming up protesting, coming up to the border fence, trying to go over to the israeli side of the border. that the soldiers fired warning shots in the air initially. when those warnings were not heeded, they ened up shooting towards their legs. the government in gaza is saying that they had killed one person and that the israeli soldiers injured 25 people. the israeli military right now not confirmi
prime minister salam fayyad. he's in washington to attend the 2012 saban forum on u.s./israel relations. it's my understanding you were against this at first. is that true? and if so, how do you feel now? >> no. i never was against it. as a matter of fact, i was very much a part of the thinking -- >> did you think it was time now? or some time down in the future? >> given the frustrations that we palestinians have had with the political process, it has not been productive. there's no question that we needed to pursue any and all available options to us. and the international law -- with the national diplomacy. and this was one of them. the question for me all along was how best to do it. provide us with some leverage going forward because what we really want end of day is genuine state where our people can live as free people with dignity. >> at the end we were just talking in the break, does this end up helping or hurting your relationship with the united states, your pursuit of something even more tangible? >> i think it depends a lot on what is done to deal with it. and whether or no
in the region. when we saw in the past week egypt rise to the forefront of mediating between israel and the palestinian factions, it was because egypt at that particular point was not -- president morrissey's hand to put leverage on them. it's a political organization from which mohammed morsi comes from. stability will have long term and regional implications for all of the issues. but in terms of immediate truce, right now it is about what's happening on the ground be in gaza and right now that is not necessarily directly linked. >> all right, everyone. we were listening there to nbc's ayman and we're taking satellite hits. this conflict is raising a question concerning security in the middle east. the role iran played with arming hamas and its own stand offwith israel. joining me is dennis ross of the washington institute for institutional policy. dennis, welcome. let's talk about the role that iran played in this conflict over the last eight, nine days. iron that out for me. >> i think we have to put it into larger perspective. i don't think they've played a role over the last f
a victory in their fight against israel and we heard from some of the leadership of that palestinian faction that times of the arab spring have changed the palestinian/israeli conflict. we expect that to have a profound impact on the situation here in gaza and across the region. they are certainly trying to spin this in a way where to their people they are coming out victorious and prepared for any possible confrontation down the road. tinge ordinary people here in gaza when you speak to them as we have throughout the course of the day have been telling us without a comprehensive solution that history is deemed to repeat itself. without a solution to end the problems of the israeli palestinian conflict, particularly here in gaza, expect it to be another round of violence somewhere on the horizon. >> ayman, thank you, reporting from gaza. martin fletcher is standing by now in tel aviv. what's the feeling there today 20 hours after the cease-fire? are people feeling good about this? describe that. >> reporter: to be honest, alex, i don't think people are feeling too bad about it. i think they
east. elections are coming up in israel, in jordan, in egypt, iran and elsewhere. we're seeing in front of our eyes more violent change happening in syria. the reverberations of which are being felt on everyone of that country's borders. elsewhere from beirut to bahrain domestic politics is at a low boil ready to burst out in a way that can affect our interests in very fundamental ways. there are two problems at the far ends of the threat spectrum. the iran nuclear challenge on the one hand and the spread of al qaeda and affiliated terrorism on the other that will continue to dominate and lest we forget within a year of taking office both presidents obama and bush, his predecessor, were faced with previously unforeseen events that fundamentally challenged their middle east policies. 9/11 for president bush and the arab spring for president obama. so there's a lot on the agenda. today we're going to take a early look at what will be and what should be the foreign policy of a second obama administration in the middle east. now we at the washington institute, for us this is just the beginn
and israel? >> no one knows for sure. but i think it will hold for a while. hamas got what they wanted, worldwide recognition. they have some restrictions removed from the blockade. they will be able to smuggle arms and hunitions -- munitions in as they have always done, despite the fact the egyptians are trying to do something about it. israeli defeated hamasalcy military capability, firing 1500 rockets and defeating 88% of those coming into population centers. so i think there is something there for erch. i think it will hold. the real winner is the iranian, as they are watching this unfold and influence in it. >> shannon: behind what is so much of what is happening there, general, thank you so much. >> good sigh you. >> shannon: fox news has confirmed that peter king will step down as the house homeland security committee. the republican representative has chaired that committee for 7 years. republicans have imposed a six-year limit for most committee chairs. king got a waiver and he is wrapping up list seventh year. it is not clear who will replace him in january of 2013. some spec
important man in the middle east and boasts an exclusive interview credited with getting israel and gaza to end fighting. let's bring in the "time" bureau chief and got the interview and joins us from tel aviv. thank you for joining us and why is morsi the most important man in the middle east? >> well, for a couple of reasons. i mean, one he is just sort of central to, you know, the sort of what they call a new sunni axis of influence. sort of powerful country is counterweight to iran emerging, you know, thinking of qatar in the gulf and turkey, certainly. egypt is just always been. it's the largest most populace county and the sort of anchor. if you're the president of egypt, you should be the most important person in the middle east and the circumstances also favoring morsi and the other reason is because he holds the sort of future of egypt in his hands right now and another revolution with what he does in the coming couple of months. >> carl, i thought it was interesting you spoke with him about his relationship with president obama. and he seems to think it's a good one. >> yeah. t
agreement between hamas and israel which may beer maybe not. maybe he did a great job. there are also arms being smuggled through egypt so maybe he got too much credit. >> he seized the day. his name is on top of all newspapers. here i am, i need to consolidate power this morning. >> charles krauthammer believes there is a connection between the praise that came from the united states and what president morsey has done now in egypt. >> i'm not surprised at all that the brotherhood is now essentially engaging in a cudahy that. the shamelessness and speed in which he did this the day after the agreement. i think the administration has to wonder whether the praise it gave which was fusive and excessive didn't give morsey the sense that he can can strike now because he has been elevated to a great world leader. he had to do the cease-fire because he needs the money and he wouldn't have had it otherwise. and also because egypt has never wanted to be dragged back into the palestine wars by the palestinians who want everybody to die on their behalf. >> he then went out and spoke to large crowds s
, praised effusively by u.s. officials for his role in mediating the israel/gaza fight. back to you in new york. gregg: it just goes to show you how quickly events can turn around in that region of the world. steve heir began, we'll check back with you a bit later on. thanks very much, in cairo. patti ann: and another hotbed in that region, the hamas terror group is now accusing israel of breaking ceasefire rules two days after a truce was reached along the israel/gaza border. israeli officials say they will investigate reports that a palestinian man was killed. israel has arrested several palestinians suspected of blowing up a bus in tel aviv. we'll bring you the latest on that when we have that. gregg: those are just a few of the many stories we are following this morning. a busy day in "america's newsroom." >>> plus, a boat trip turning deadly off the coast of florida. how 23 people ended up in a fight for their lives. patti ann: and tragedy on the highway. a chain reaction crash causing a 140-car pile-up. we'll tell you how this happened. gregg: plus, ambassador susan rice under fire f
? and what does that mean for is cale and the -- israel and rest of the middle east? former ambassador to the u.n. dan gillerman will be with us moments away. he will give us his perspective coming up. bill: a surprise announcement from israel. president ehud barak says he is quit politics but will stay on after the january elections in israel. often seen as a moderating force and in considering possible military action. he is 70 years old. he says he wants to spend more time with his family. that news out of israel. martha: it is a very busy morning here in "america's newsroom.". ahead evidence iran has used the recent israel-gaza crisis as a bit of distraction from the rest of the world. we have details on secret operations ahead in a fox news exclusive. bill: was this a white house cover up after the days after the attacks in benghazi and the days before? there are new allegations from leading republicans on that. kt mcfarland will break it down. >> it is assumed the proportions of any other major scandal in this town. there are many layers to the onions. there are all kinds of ques
because israel is a one bomb count country. hi, clifford, what do you mean by a one bomb country? >> people don't realize how small israel is, it's smaller than djabouti and the muslim countries around it are 600 times its size with about 60 times the population. what's been said by iranian rulers, it would take actually one bomb, one bomb to wipe out the entire country and if they did that and israel rehe al yates, more than a billion muslims left, why not. >> i've heard that israel is the size of new jersey and carries so much weight in the world, but it's that small. so what do you make of in cease-fire? does this accomplish anything? >> the cease-fire does accomplish something. it was important for israel to get rid of the iranian supplied longer range missiles that hamas it. the m-75's, reach more than half the population, it could reach from gaza, tel aviv, jerusalem, some came pretty close to hitting those places and they had to get rid of those and by the way, should there be a conflict in the next few, six, eight months between israel and iran, it was important for israe
, israel is demanding that hamas stop firing rockets across the border. is there a willingness to do this or has the number of civilian casualties made a cease-fire now much less likely? >> well, you know, the fact that the negotiations are ongoing is an indication that palestinian factions can abide by the truce. in fact, in the past it's been on multiple occasions documented that palestinian factions have been committed to the truce until there's been some kind of violation, if you will, from the israeli side that israel justifies as an act in its own security. nonetheless, palestinian factions say they have abided by it in the past, they would abide by it again in the future if there is one in place. the question is can they get to that agreement in the next couple hours before time runs out. and the question really surrounding the truce have to deal with the cessation of hostilities. israel wants an immediate cessation of hostilities. then enter into negotiations about lifting a five-year-old siege and blockade on gaza. palestinians say that is unacceptable. that it has to be an
the cease-fire because israel's response was quick. they fired warning shots at the palestinians, in the end they ended up killing one of the forces. palestinians are going to be protesting that to the united nations. but at the same time hamas also responded quickly. today they're keeping protesters away from the fence. they don't want any more of these kinds of clashes with israelis see as provocations. so i think it's clear both sides do want the cease-fire to continue. they both have a very strong vested interest in doing so. and that kind of incident yesterday, which led to the unfortunate death of one palestinian, i doubt that will be repeated in the days to come. the emphasis on both sides is going to be on the next stage, which as you mentioned, which is outlining the details, dealing with the details of what the cease-fire is, what it leads to. what they've got so far is what they've called quiet for quiet. both sides not shooting. what's next is the beginning of the negotiations. it's quite clear what the two sides want although it's going to appear complicated. it's simple and it'
. this is what democracy is all about. >> what does this do to israel and to the united states? >> well, look. i mean we -- let's not -- you know egypt is the most important arab state, the first state to sign a peace treaty with israel in the 1970s. egypt is a major, major ally of the united states, not vis-a-vis just israel but also in the broader middle east as well. it affects not just egypt but the neighborhood as well. egypt played a critical role this brokering a truce between hamas and israel. hamas looks up to morsi. hamas listens them. even israel, i would argue, recognize the frounld invasion of hamas because egypt is a pivotal player and because the peace treaty was on line. that's why what happens in egypt not only affects egyptians, it affects the neighborhood and egypt relation with the person powers. in particular it affects them in the middle east and rain world. >> right now a 100-constituent assembly is working on drafting a constitution in egypt. liberals and christians walked out. so basically it's being run by islamists now. some have said part of president morsi's calculat
with israel, and the united states. and anybody else belonging to the u.n. just for some context here, though, the plo has been a permanent observer. that's been their status since 1974. and that has given palestinians the right to speak out and be heard at the assembly. but it doesn't give them a right to vote. richard roth, who covers the u.n. extensively and is our cnn favorite on this topic, is there to really give a little more context as to what they wanted to and what kind of status it would give them and how far up in status it would actually elevate them. richard, tell us what it means. >> okay. first, just to clarify, hamas not really here with the palestinians. the palestinian president abbas is in new york, met with the secretary general last night. yes, this is, as usual with the u.n., words matter. sometimes one letter in a document could be a time bomb. what we have here is the u.n. upgrading later today the status of the palestinians here. they are in effect going to become sort of a state within a group of states. but really, as you mentioned, they won't have the right to vot
. cc >> eliot: while the election has focused on future hamas and israel continue an escalation of their conflict? we begin with the testimony of general petraeus. the testimony was closed to the public but inside members were shown realtime video of the attack taken by predator drone. petraeus believed immediately it was a terrorist act and opinions were changed by other agencies before being released. i assured that changes were not made for political reasons. he concluded that ambassador's rice intelligence reflected the best intelligence at the time that could be released publicly. >> the problem with what susan rice is not what she had stuck shuck with it. she went beyond that. >> meanwhile, gas are a firing rockets and israel responded by removing 16,000 reswervist troops to the border. today strongly asserted egypt's support, i repeat. he warned that quote, egypt today is different from egypt yesterday and the asias today are different from the asias yesterday. joining me now pj crowley. now a professor at george washington university. thank you for joining us. >> a pleas
a state established years ago, and that is israel. rather, we came to affirm the legitimacy of a state that must now achieve its independence, and this is palestine. >> sreenivasan: palestinians said the vote would strengthen their hand in future peace talks with israel. but the israeli ambassador to the u.n., ron prosor, warned that the palestinians are turning their backs on peace. >> for as long as president abbas prefers symbolism over reality, as long as he prefers to travel to new york for u.n. resolutions rather than travel to jerusalem for genuine dialogue, any hope of peace will be out of reach. >> sreenivasan: meanwhile, a bipartisan group of u.s. senators said today they will push to cut off u.s. aid, if the palestinians use their new status to bring israel before the international criminal court. in iraq, a wave of attacks today killed at least 43 people. most of the victims were in the city of hillah, south of baghdad. back-to-back explosions targeted shi-ite pilgrims and emergency responders. the force of the blasts left twisted wreckage of cars outside shops in a busy co
. israel approves thousands of new settlements in the west bank. plus texas senator elect ted cruz not even sworn in yet, but he's already fueling speculation of a 2016 run. just one of the things that we thought you should know. anncr: some politicians seem to think medicare and... social security are just numbers in a budget. well, we worked hard for those benefits. we earned them. and if washington tries to cram decisions about the future... of these programs into a last minute budget deal... we'll all pay the price. aarp is fighting to protect seniors with responsible... solutions that strengthen medicare and... social security for generations to come. we can do better than a last minute deal... that would hurt all of us. is bigger than we think ... sometimelike the flu.fer from with aches, fever and chills- the flu's a really big deal. so why treat it like it's a little cold? there's something that works differently than over-the-counter remedies. prescription tamiflu attacks the flu virus at its source. so don't wait. call your doctor right away. tamiflu is prescription medicine for t
cooperation between israel and gaza in the near future. >> the united states welcomes the agreement today for a cease-fire in gaza, for it to hold, the rocket attacks must end. a broader calm returned. the people of this region deserve the chance to live free from fear and violence and today's agreement is a step in the right direction that we should build on. >> this news comes after more than a week of violence that claimed 140 palestinian and 5 israeli lives. obviously, this day belongs to the israelis and palestinians. but americans should also look at today as proof that we got it right on election day. i want you to take a look at that scene again. that moment lasted just a few minutes. but it represents a week of slow, deliberate diplomacy by the president, secretary clinton and obama's foreign policy team. and a lot of patience. there was no sabre rattling, no caustic words, no cheap shots. for that you needed to turn to the republicans. >> if this god forbid conflict escalates, again, it is a sign of american weakness throughout the region. before in crises henry kissinger or jim
cause of death is listed as a stroke. many palestinians believe he was poisoned by israel. that something israel denies. the bottom line here in life he was controversial and in death, bill, he also remains very controversial. bill: what is this pallonium poison? >> it is a radioactive element that can be extremely, extremely deadly. according to u.s. regulatory, nuclear regulatory commission it emits radiation that can essentially destroy human tissue. it can not we are told penetrate skin. if ingested it can cause deadly harm to dna, to main body organs and as well as we are told the immune system. and this particular isotope is so powerful, bill, that we're told that an amount as small as the size of a grain of salt can be deadly. another thing to keep in mind is that it decays very, very quickly. it has a very short half-life. in other words, officials say, after 2 1/2 years it might be very hard to detect. that means after arafat has been buried since 2004, whatever results are reached might in fact be inconclusive. bill? bill: david lee miller, a good mystery you hav
interest of israel or perhaps the middle east overall. david lee miller joins us live in jerusalem. david, what is the reaction from israel to this planned vote today at the u.n.? >> the israeli reaction to the vote which is scheduled for thursday, martha is essentially one of resignation. there is not a lot of drum ma or uncertainty about the out cox the vote. israel and much of the world fully expects that the palestinian bid for a known observer status to pass overwhelmingly at the united nation. israel says it rejects the notion that the pal steup palestinians are acting eu unilaterally. israel has to be tkaeufl tha to to be careful that it doesn't impose sanctions or things that are damaging to mahmoud abbas. it could lead to a strengthening of hamas. as to the palestinian authority this is largely a symbolic effort. 132 nations currently recognize palestine. they are hoping for a vote that could produce 170 positive votes. we'll find out very soon. martha: we sure will. david lee thank you. bill: republicans have their own version of the d.r.e.a.m. act. how do you solve illegal immi
shuck with it. she went beyond that. >> meanwhile, gas are a firing rockets, and israel responded by removing 16,000 reswervist troops to the border. today strongly asserted egypt's support, i repeat. he warned that quote, egypt today is different from egypt yesterday today are different from the asias yesterday. joining me now pj crowley. now a professor at george washington university. thank you for joining us. >> a pleasure, eliot. >> eliot: it seems to me with all this screaming and shouting about susan rice's testimony. the only thing that struck me for legitimate upset might be that general petraeus has said he believed it was a terrorist and the u.n. ambassador said originally it was not that. is that a legitimate area of some investigation by congress? >> in fairness to susan rice. she did not say it was an act of terrorist. she didn't rule it out either. she made clear her understanding of what happened would evolve over time. the significance of general petraeus on the hill is begin a more fullsome process to answer questions that still don't have complete answers. the s
.s. believes and has consistently believed for decades that only direct peace talks between israel and the palestinians can achieve a long lasting settlement. not through international organizations such as the united nations. though, the u.n. could eventually be helpful once there is a peace. the united states, canada, and very few others here voted in the negative. the palestinians didn't get all the european support they wanted. this morning actually canada is recalling some of its ambassa r ambassadors from new york and in the middle east for consultations probably for security reasons. canada gave a very public opposition speech before this vote. but the -- you mentioned is it symbolic, is it political, what are the significance -- what is it? it could be all of it, because now the palestinians could join international organizations and treaties such as the international criminal court and perhaps challenge and go after and accuse israel for war crimes for any future actions, maybe join aviation treaties, maybe control the water off its coast in the middle east, it's all uncl
. there was word today that israel has approved construction of 3,000 new homes in jewish settlements on the west bank. the associated press reported the development one day after the u.n. general assembly recognized palestine as a non-member observer state, including gaza, the west bank and east jerusalem. the palestinians quickly condemned any new settlement building. chief negotiator saeb erekat accused israel of "defying the whole international community." in syria, internet access and most phone service was blocked for a second day. opposition activists blamed the regime. government officials insisted rebels were behind the outage. meanwhile, fighting continued in and around damascus, but government troops managed to reopen the road to the city's airport. the u.s. soldier accused of espionage in the wikileaks document dump has conceded he considered suicide after his arrest. private first class bradley manning was cross-examined today in a pre-trial hearing at fort meade, maryland. he admitted making a noose out of bed sheets before being sent to the u.s. marine corps brig at quantico, virgi
their strong support for the state of israel. i wouldn't say every mailing we sent out, but just about every mailing that we sent out mentioned either obama removing jerusalem as the capital of israel from his platform and then belatedly reinserting it, or it mentioned his call for israel to return to '67 borders, or it mentioned the fact that his administration had slow-walked sanctions against iran. and those issues have real resonance among pro-israel evangelicals. >> jonathan saw hasn't is one of washington's most thoughtful journalists. he's been covering this sector for a long time, and thank you, ralph, for your comments. he is the money and politics reporter for bloomberg, and he's also the past president of the national press club. what did you see yesterday, and what does it mean for the country? >> well, in 2010 we saw all this secret money into the races, and the republicans took control of the senate and the house, and all observers said this is just going to be a foreshadowing of 2012. it wasn't. obama was able to raise as much money as romney. romney had help with some of the
israel is the culprit. what they really want to the know is who helped them? allen pizzey ramallah. >>> and former fbi assistant director joins us now. what do you make of this? >> this harkens back to the alexander case in london. the former kgb spy also poisoned with polonium 210. that was 2006. this was 2004. dropped in his tea by somebody he met at a hotel you and i have been to in the square. that also suggests if you look at the arafat case the amount of proximity you would have to have to do this in other words, there weren't half a dozen plo leaders or family member whose got sick when somebody poisoned a meal. if in fact this turns out to be a poisoning, it had to be somebody one on one who to cut this into this drink in a fair amount. >> i know polonium 210 used with alexander and suspected with yasser arafat. his body has been interred for years. what's the chances they'll find traces of that? >> the fbi, the guy who worked on the other case a shelf life of 138 days. a pound of it 138, a half pound of it. interred since 2004. a highly concentrated bu
. there was the agreement with israel, mubarak was an ally of the united states, a cut off aid not good to his own people but cooperated with us with the war on terror. all of the ingredients were there 18 months ago they are still there but 75% of the population is under the age of 30. they don't have jobs and the prospects. they toppled their dictator but things have not got better so they are back on the streets. >> did we misinterpret what the appraise saying was about? arab sprained, fighting for there rights when it was about religion? >> more about economic prospects. revolutions happen with a large baby-boom population. american revolution. chinese revolution, french revolution. even eastern europe and the soviet union. with a population bubble when you add economic disaster with good prospects down the road people take to the streets the economy in egypt has not gotten better. >> then to have the right course of the track them to replace with another dictator. >> that has not because of political stability. they are getting their money out with business opportunities and prospects so people are
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 51 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)